What do Spanish Paella, Italian Risotto and Saudi Arabian Coffee Have in Common?

In our continuing quest to bring you the finest foods from around the world, two items we consider critical have, until now, eluded us. We spent hours online and more hours on the phone in a series of attempts to find reliable sources for these items, all in vain.

By serendipity, however, last week we were able to track down excellent sources for both. The second of these should be available in the coming days.

But the first, which is also the answer to the question posed in the subject line, is already available in our store.

> It’s SAFFRON.

Now available in powder form, in thread and premium thread form, and mixed with curry in our Kashmiri Saffron Curry Powder.

And to celebrate the minor miracle that now allows us to offer it to you reliably, we want to offer you a 10% discount on any saffron purchase you make. We are confident that once you try this stuff, you’ll come back for more. Use the coupon code SAFFRON10 at checkout before June 30th to claim your discount.

And stay tuned for our next product announcement and discount. It’s another good one. We promise.

Bon Appetit!

What is Sauce Sarcenes?

Welcome to Freaky Spice Friday!

So why are we discussing a sauce on Freaky Spice Friday?  Well, because this week’s featured spice is Cubeb Berries (bear with us here).  The only modern cuisine making extensive use of Cubeb is Moroccan (though it is also used to flavor gin and as an adulterant in Patchouli oil).  But in medieval time, it was used and traded extensively throughout Europe, Asia, and North Africa.

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Have You Had Your Dukkah Today?

Dukkah

Since starting Shami’s Gourmet, we have learned about so many new and exotic foods. One that really caught my eye is the Egyptian spice Dukkah (or Duqqa). It is a mixture of herbs, nuts and spices and it’s most common use is as a dip with vegetables or fresh bread.

The origin of the word “Duqqa” is from Arabic which means “to pound”. The mixture of ingredients in Dukkah are pounded together after being dry roasted to a texture that is neither powder or pastelike. It is a texture all its own.

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